Vegan Deli

Vegan Deli  by Jo Stepaniak

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Raising Vegetarian Children
by Jo Stepaniak, M.S.Ed., & Vesanto Melina M.S., R.D.

Raising Vegetarian Children

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Do you have questions about being vegan? Send them to Jo using this easy form. She would be happy to address your individual concerns as well as general inquiries about vegan ethics, philosophy, practical applications, and living compassionately. Jo cannot respond to questions about nutrition or answer questions that have already been addressed in the Archives

Jo will make every attempt to answer each question personally, however, due to her schedule, this may not be possible. If a reply is forthcoming, it could take up to a few weeks, so please be patient. It is also possible that your question will be answered directly in the "Ask Jo!" column rather than an individual response.

If you'd like to view previous questions Jo has answered, visit the Ask Jo! Archives.

Is Silk Vegan?

question.gif - 1.4 K Is silk vegan? Are there other fabrics besides leather and wool that aren't vegan?

answer.gif - 1.3 K Silk is not vegan. It is a viscous protein substance secreted from the glands of silkworms which hardens into silk on contact with air. This soft, lustrous fiber is obtained from the cocoon of the silkworm. In order to retain a single, unbroken filament, the silkworm is killed before it can emerge from the cocoon and break the thread. Slaughtering silkworms for their silk is done by boiling, baking, or steaming the live worm directly in its cocoon. When the worm is in this chrysalis stage it is not dead; it is transforming. Therefore, we must believe on faith that its sentience remains intact. To assume otherwise would be unconscionable.

Selective breeding over many generations has expunged the moth's ability to fly. Certain chrysalis are kept aside to allow the moths to emerge and mate. After the female lays her eggs, she is crushed and inspected for diseases. If she appears diseased, her eggs are immediately destroyed. After mating, the males are dumped into a basket and discarded as refuse. According to research conducted by Beauty Without Cruelty, India, approximately fifteen hundred chrysalis are killed to produce one hundred grams of pure silk.

Depending on the weave, style, design, or place where it is woven, silk may be called different names in the marketplace. Some common euphemisms for certain types of woven silk are pure chiffon, pure georgette, organza, pure crepe, pure satin, and raw silk. When buying clothing (including the lining and trim), ties, handkerchiefs, handbags, hats, ribbons, curtains, upholstered furniture, embroidered items, and typewriter/printer ribbons, check the label for fabric content. Chiffon, georgette, crepe, and satin may also be made of synthetic fibers.

The skin, fleece, feathers, shells, hair, or body parts of any animal, bird, fish, or insect are not considered vegan. This includes fur, down, camel's hair, mohair, angora, tortoiseshell, snakeskin, ivory, bone, pearls, and so forth. The list of animals and their body parts used for human garments and accessories is extensive. When shopping, just use your common sense, and don't purchase something if you don't know its origin; hold off until you can investigate it further. There are many vegan alternatives for practically all of these animal-based commodities, for example faux pearls, rayon instead of silk, synthetic fiberfill instead of down, polar fleece instead of wool, and taugua nut instead of ivory.




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Vegan Vittles:
Second Helpings

Vegan Vittles: Second Helpings by Jo Stepaniak

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The Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook

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Review by Dan Balogh

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The Food Allergy
Survival Guide

The Food Allergy Survival Guide

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