Vegan Deli

Vegan Deli  by Jo Stepaniak

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Raising Vegetarian Children
by Jo Stepaniak, M.S.Ed., & Vesanto Melina M.S., R.D.

Raising Vegetarian Children

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Do you have questions about being vegan? Send them to Jo using this easy form. She would be happy to address your individual concerns as well as general inquiries about vegan ethics, philosophy, practical applications, and living compassionately. Jo cannot respond to questions about nutrition or answer questions that have already been addressed in the Archives

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Too Much Nutritional Yeast?

question.gif - 1.4 K I sprinkle nutritional yeast on or in most of the foods that I prepare for myself at home (soups, sauces, steamed veggies, salads, etc.). Is there such a thing as too much nutritional yeast in one's diet, or is it pretty much harmless?

answer.gif - 1.3 K Moderate amounts of Red Star Vegetarian Support Formula nutritional yeast not only taste good but can add many valuable nutrients to our diet, such as folic acid; B-complex vitamins, including vitamin B12; and several important minerals and amino acids. However, large amounts of nutritional yeast used on a daily basis is not wise. A healthful vegan diet requires the inclusion of a variety of wholesome foods. Reliance on one particular item, no matter how beneficial, can establish a nutritional imbalance. The same is true of nutritional supplements -- too much of a good thing isn't good. Nutritional yeast is both a food and a nutritional supplement.

Nutritional yeast is high in purines. Large quantities of purines in the diet create an abundance of uric acid, which has been associated with several ailments, including gout. Furthermore, overreliance on a single food in the diet may eventually cause a sensitivity or possibly even an allergy to that food.

The recommended daily amount of nutritional yeast is approximately 2 tablespoons of large flakes, 1 1/2 tablespoons of miniflakes, or 1 heaping tablespoon of powder. Occasionally having larger servings than this should not pose a problem, but on a regular basis it would be smart to stay closer to these guidelines.




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Vegan Vittles:
Second Helpings

Vegan Vittles: Second Helpings by Jo Stepaniak

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The Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook

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Review by Dan Balogh

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The Food Allergy
Survival Guide

The Food Allergy Survival Guide

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