Vegan Deli

Vegan Deli  by Jo Stepaniak

Click here to learn more

Order this book!

 

 

Raising Vegetarian Children
by Jo Stepaniak, M.S.Ed., & Vesanto Melina M.S., R.D.

Raising Vegetarian Children

Click here to learn more

Order this book!

 
     

Do you have questions about being vegan? Send them to Jo using this easy form. She would be happy to address your individual concerns as well as general inquiries about vegan ethics, philosophy, practical applications, and living compassionately. Jo cannot respond to questions about nutrition or answer questions that have already been addressed in the Archives

Jo will make every attempt to answer each question personally, however, due to her schedule, this may not be possible. If a reply is forthcoming, it could take up to a few weeks, so please be patient. It is also possible that your question will be answered directly in the "Ask Jo!" column rather than an individual response.

If you'd like to view previous questions Jo has answered, visit the Ask Jo! Archives.

Vegan Bread

I would like to know what kinds of vegan breads are available and where can I find them?

Vegan breads abound in all varieties -- from Italian rolls to Essene bread to whole grain buns to bagels, pita, chapatis, tortillas, and beyond. Small bakeries often have a few vegan items among their options, as do most well-stocked supermarkets. The most wholesome and widest array of vegan breads, however, can be found in natural food stores. The commercially produced breads that most supermarkets carry frequently contain dough conditioners, colorants, chemicals, or preservatives. Although many of these items may be vegan, they are unnecessary additives that health-conscious consumers generally avoid.

Wherever you purchase your bread, be sure to read the ingredient label carefully. Frequently used non-vegan ingredients include, among other things, eggs, milk, milk powder, whey, butter, and honey. The easiest way to determine with certainty that a bread is vegan is to look for simple ingredients that are easily recognizable and clearly understood, such as whole wheat flour, sprouted wheat berries, cornmeal, yeast, canola oil, barley malt, and so on. Avoid buying breads with ingredients that are confusing or do not sound like real foods.

Basic yeasted bread requires just a few ordinary ingredients: flour, water, and yeast. Nevertheless, it is common to find a few other items added to vegan breads -- such as sweeteners (for example, molasses, maple syrup, or malt syrup), salt, sprouted grains, soy milk, nuts, seeds, herbs, or vegetable oil -- that add flavor, impart richness, create a finer crumb, improve texture, or promote a higher rise.

Most pita breads, plain bagels, chapatis, and corn tortillas are vegan, but always check the ingredients to be sure. Flour tortillas are often vegan, but some brands contain lard, which is an animal fat. Some brands of crackers may also contain lard, butter, milk derivatives, or cheese. Many commercially produced baked goods, including breads and crackers, contain cottonseed oil or hydrogenated fats, which are vegan but not very healthful.

Finding vegan bread is not difficult. In fact, bread, in all its forms, is one of the more readily available vegan foods. The secret is to look closely at ingredient labels, ask questions, and seek out the highest quality product made with comprehendible ingredients.




Copyright © 1998-2013 by Jo Stepaniak   All rights reserved.
Nothing on this web site may be reproduced in any way
without express written permission from the copyright holder.

 

 
 

Vegan Vittles:
Second Helpings

Vegan Vittles: Second Helpings by Jo Stepaniak

Click here to learn more

Order this book!

 

 

The Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook

Click here to learn more

Review by Dan Balogh

View Readers' Comments

Order this book!

 

 

The Food Allergy
Survival Guide

The Food Allergy Survival Guide

Click here to learn more

Order this book!