Vegan Deli

Vegan Deli  by Jo Stepaniak

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Raising Vegetarian Children
by Jo Stepaniak, M.S.Ed., & Vesanto Melina M.S., R.D.

Raising Vegetarian Children

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Do you have questions about being vegan? Send them to Jo using this easy form. She would be happy to address your individual concerns as well as general inquiries about vegan ethics, philosophy, practical applications, and living compassionately. Jo cannot respond to questions about nutrition or answer questions that have already been addressed in the Archives

Jo will make every attempt to answer each question personally, however, due to her schedule, this may not be possible. If a reply is forthcoming, it could take up to a few weeks, so please be patient. It is also possible that your question will be answered directly in the "Ask Jo!" column rather than an individual response.

If you'd like to view previous questions Jo has answered, visit the Ask Jo! Archives.

Should Vegans be Vocal?

question.gif - 1.4 K Is it necessary for vegans to be activists?


answer.gif - 1.3 K

Activism as defined by Webster's is "a doctrine or practice that emphasizes direct vigorous action, especially in support of or opposition to one side of a controversial issue." Within the parameters of this definition, there are many different kinds of activism that could be suitable for vegans: environmental protection, environmental justice, deep ecology, animal rights, civil rights, human rights, social justice, economic justice, nonviolent conflict resolution, hunger relief, gender equity, rights for sexual minorities, religious freedom, labor equity, abolition of vivisection, abolition of capital punishment, boycotting exploitative industries, and numerous others. Even though many vegans may be drawn to activism that is specifically related to animal suffering, such as "food animal" agriculture, fur, vivisection, hunting, animal exhibitions, animal racing, puppy mills, and similar concerns, there are countless opportunities for non-animal-related direct action in which vegans could become involved.

The definition of veganism does not compel adherents to be activists in the strictest sense of the term. This is because veganism is a philosophy and way of living that is expressed chiefly through the compassionate day-to-day choices that each practitioner makes. Veganism is not a political movement, even though both insiders and outsiders may see it as a political statement or a loosely organized social movement. A shared philosophy and the dynamic application of vegan principles is what unites vegans everywhere. "Direct action" by vegans is most commonly asserted merely through the daily application of basic vegan values. These tenets do not encourage or discourage zealous activism. One can comply with all the requirements of veganism and be highly outspoken, participate in nonviolent conflict or civil disobedience, engage in protests or boycotts, or remain subdued and unobtrusive.

Generally speaking, the vegan lifestyle itself is a form of activism, regardless of how public or private vegans may be about their convictions. On the one hand, the vegan ethic does not oblige vegans to participate in any type of explicit activism. On the other hand, activism could be construed as an intrinsic and consequential aspect of simply being vegan.




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Vegan Vittles:
Second Helpings

Vegan Vittles: Second Helpings by Jo Stepaniak

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The Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook

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Review by Dan Balogh

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The Food Allergy
Survival Guide

The Food Allergy Survival Guide

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