Animals

 

J Morris Hicks

J Morris Hicks

Posted April 11, 2013

Published in Animals

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Slaughterhouses. New York Times article misses the point.

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Unnecessary suffering. Part of a miserable process that need not exist

Over a four-day span last week, I spoke to several hundred sixth graders at a middle school in New London, CT. (See links below for details). Prior to the presentations, I had been warned by a senior educator and colleague to stay away from delicate topics like animal suffering or the implication that we must never eat meat or dairy. God forbid that we should tell our kids what's really going on behind the scenes.

The first class to hear the Food Math 101 message in the United States---at Bennie Dover Jackson Middle School in New London, CT
The first class to hear the Food Math 101 message in the United States---at Bennie Dover Jackson Middle School in New London, CT

So, I was a good boy and chose "sustainability" as my primary focus. Of course, I emphasized the potential for disease-reversing, whole foods, plant-based eating to lower our health care costs in the United States---but I also stressed that I wasn't necessarily talking about a vegetarian or vegan way of eating.

Rather, I emphasized the maximization of "whole plants" in the diet---as a percent of calories. I told them early in my talk that if they were unsure about the correct answer to a question---that it was probably whole plants. 

The title of my presentation was Food Math 101. The overriding message was that we'd all need to add a lot of whole plants to our daily routine so that the numbers behind what we're eating would enable Mother Earth to sustain our species. Since she has a finite amount of arable land, water and fossil fuel, we must learn to live within those natural and permanent restrictions to our lifestyle. And right now, we are failing miserably in three ways: The size of our population, the way we live and the way we eat. Click here to continue reading this article. 

—J. Morris Hicks, board member, T. Colin Campbell Foundation


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