Health

 

J Morris Hicks

J Morris Hicks

Posted May 1, 2013

Published in Health

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How many people do you know that have heart disease?

Read More: Reversing heart disease

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Probably a great many more than you think.

Think of how many people you know over thirty; then multiply that number by 90%. You see, most people in the United States over the age of thirty already have heart disease, although most of them have never experienced the first symptom. And far too often that first symptom is a deadly heart attack.

That's what happened to Mike---a good friend of mine in Stonington, CT, a few weeks ago. He was 71, an avid skier, sailor, exercised regularly and was apparently in very good health. While expecting to enjoy many more years of travel, leisure, volunteer work and great times with friends and family---his life was snatched away in an instant. It is the memory of Mike that inspired me to write this post today. Maybe his story will help to save others; he would like that.

This photo illustrates the way I will remember my good friend---enjoying time on the water with me and my oldest grandson, Collin. Unfortunately for Mike's grandchildren, they will not be able to sail with their grandfather ever again. Because Mike died of heart disease on April 5, 2013.

In the summer of 2009, my oldest grandson, Collin (7), stayed with me for a week while he was here for “sailing camp” at the SHYC foundation. In his thoughtful and generous manner (as always), Mike asked Collin (at breakfast) if he’d like to take a motorboat ride that afternoon. Naturally, he responded in a gleeful affirmative. A few hours later, as the fog lifted, the three of us enjoyed a spirited tour of Stonington Harbor---with young Collin at the helm.
My friend Mike in 2009. That summer, my oldest grandson, Collin (7), stayed with me for a week while he was in town for “sailing camp.” In his thoughtful and generous manner (as always), Mike asked Collin (at breakfast) if he’d like to take a motorboat ride that afternoon. Naturally, he responded in a gleeful affirmative. A few hours later, as the fog lifted, the three of us enjoyed a spirited tour of Stonington Harbor---with young Collin at the helm.

So did Mike know that he had heart disease? I doubt it, although I know that he visited a number of physicians regularly and he may have been taking cholesterol lowering drugs. But no one dies from high cholesterol. Cholesterol is just a bio-marker. Click here to continue reading this article. 

—J. Morris Hicks, board member, T. Colin Campbell Foundation


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