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From: Learning Through History 10/20/12 (vegsource dealer program)
Subject:         Space Race Unit Study - only $6.25
Date: October 8, 2012 at 12:02 pm PST

SPACE RACE UNIT STUDY


Looking for a great unit study or supplement for your history curriculum on the World War II for students ages 9 and up? Also a great resource for parents and educators teaching younger children! This issue of Learning Through History magazine is perfect for a unit on the World War II!

64 pages of material including:

• 15 articles with discussion questions and activities
• 1 arts & crafts project
• 2 complete historical literature study guides - ages 9-12 (middle-school) and 12+ (high school)
• Book and video lists for each article
• Web links for each article

Only $6.25 plus shipping. Shipping is $2.40 via USPS first class.

The Space Race can be purchased: in our online store or Call 1-888-852-1751 M-F from 9-5 EST to order or for more info. We accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, and Paypal.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:


HISTORY TIMELINE

Timeline of Space Race events from 1957 to 1975.

A DAY IN THE LIFE DURING ... THE SPACE RACE

Meet Mary, a high school student in the late 1960s who is enchanted with the space program and dreams of a career as an astronaut.

A REAL ROCKET MAN: WILLIAM H. PICKERING

The Soviets were one step ahead of the United States until 1962. That year Pickering and his team developed the Mariner 2, which made its way to Venus. America could finally claim an important first in the space race. For his contribution, Pickering was pictured on the cover of Time magazine. On November 28, 1964, Mariner 4 was launched for Mars. The next July Pickering was again on the cover of Time – learn about the life and career of this real rocket man.

MORE THAN A SPACE RACE

The space race was a heated struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union. Both nations were in a head-to-head competition to prove to the world that they were the superior power. How did each nation try to prove this? By working tirelessly to develop the best space and military technologies faster than their rival nation – find out how role the CORONA program played in this rivalry.

EXPLORING STRANGE NEW WORLDS: VENUS AND MARS
The Space Race wasn’t just a race to the Moon, although in the United States, the lion’s share of funding was going to the Moon program. This required American planetary scientists to fight for the money they needed to reach planets such as Venus and Mars, while the Soviets were busily moving forward in their ambitious attempts – uncover which country achieved its planetary objectives.

HISTORY SHAPES AMERICA’S NEW SPACECRAFT

To build the next generation of American spacecraft – the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle – NASA is using hardware and rockets that were developed for earlier projects such as the Saturn rockets and the space shuttle program. Listen to NASA scientist Phil Sumrall as he talks about this blend of NASA history with the future.

GOING BANANAS IN SPACE

In January of 1961, one of the world’s first star sailors waited to launch into space at Cape Canaveral, Fla. Bad weather and equipment problems delayed the flight for over six hours. A little before noon, powerful Redstone rocket engines blasted the Mercury capsule high above Earth. Lights flashed on the panel in front of the astronaut and he pulled levers to make pellets roll into a metal cup. As he soared higher and higher, he munched his banana-flavored treats and sipped water through a narrow tube. Ham the chimponaut was only one of the many animals, insects, birds, reptiles, and fish who have ventured into space. Let’s learn more about these space pioneers and their contributions to the space race.

STARS AND WARS: THE INCREDIBLE LIFE OF YURI GAGARIN

The Soviet leaders wanted to win the space race to prove that Russian communism was better than American capitalism. This meant they had to make sure the first man in space was a Russian cosmonaut and not an American astronaut. Learn about the life of Yuri Gagarin and how he became the first man in space and fulfilled the dream of the Soviet Union.

ALAN SHEPARD: FIRST AMERICAN IN SPACE

On May 5, 1961, Alan Shepard sat in his cramped capsule atop an enormous Mercury-Redstone 3 rocket. At thirty-seven years old, he was about to become the first American in space, and it seemed as if his whole life had been leading up to this moment – find out why.

LIVE FROM THE MOON

Forty years ago, 500 million spellbound viewers watched Neil Armstrong’s famous first steps on the Moon. The power of television brought them together on that momentous occasion, just as it had captured each triumphant and challenging step along the path of space exploration. Find out how the power of television that first convinced Americans they could and would put a man on the Moon, and helped shape the history of the
Space Race.

VALENTINA TERESHKOVA: FIRST WOMAN IN SPACE

Think of your dream job. Do you want to be a professional basketball player? A huge music star? The president of the United States? Imagine writing a letter to someone who could make that happen. Now imagine that person writing back to grant that dream – because that is exactly what happened to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space.

THE MERCURY 13: WOMEN OF THE SPACE RACE

Alan Shepard. John Glenn. Neil Armstrong. Buzz Aldrin. When reading the names of the American astronauts of the space race, one can’t help but notice there are no women on the list. No American woman would travel to space until astronaut Sally Ride did so in 1983. One wonders: why weren’t any American women involved in the race to
outer space? In truth – there were – but they never made it off the ground. Learn about the Mercury 13 and why these women never took off.

SPACE IS RADIOACTIVE: THE VAN ALLEN BELTS

Light’s dominance over the Earth ensured that the process of evolution resulted in humanity being able to see visible light in all its forms and manifestations. Over centuries, we learned that infrared heat, X-rays, and radio waves acted in a similar way, but were actually invisible electromagnetic radiation. The twentieth century brought another surprise: a different form of radiation also streamed in from every corner of space – the Van Allen Belts.

SPIN-OFFS FROM SPACE

People often ask what benefits Americans have received from the money spent in space. The answer is that they’re everywhere. Since 1976, when NASA started documenting the results, about 1,400 NASA inventions can be shown to have aided U.S. industry, improved the quality of life, and created jobs for Americans. Of course, the spinoffs started long before 1976. Learn what NASA developed during the Apollo
and Skylab programs that we take for granted today.

SKYLAB:AT HOME IN ORBIT

When Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first person to walk on the dusty soil of the Moon in July 1969, the space race between the United Sates and the Soviet Union seemed to be over. America had won – or had it? Even as later Apollo missions continued exploring the lunar surface, Soviet space program managers gave up plans for Moon trips and refocused on establishing space stations (named Salyuts) in low orbit around the Earth. Find out why NASA felt it had to respond to the challenge posed by the Salyuts, and how that decision was the birth of Skylab, America’s first space station.

DIPLOMACY AMONG THE STARS:THE APOLLO-SOYUZ MISSION

It was 1975, six years after the United States unofficially won the space race by landing a man on the Moon. Unbelievably, while the Soviet Union and the United States were still in the midst of political and economic competition all around the world, these two rival superpowers decided to put their differences aside and join together on a space mission. Learn how the Apollo- Soyuz mission saw astronauts and cosmonauts shake hands in the middle of space, a moment broadcast live on television to a stunned world below.

ARTS & CRAFTS

SPACE FOOD

LITERATURE STUDY GUIDES

COUNTDOWN
(Middle School)

I, ROBOT
(High School)

Only $6.25 plus shipping. Shipping is $2.40 via USPS first class.

Learning Through History, The Space Race can be purchased in our online store We accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, and Paypal.

Email us at LearningThroughHistory.com .


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