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Blogs Tagged As:
"black tea"

Entries tagged with: black tea

3 result(s) displayed (1 - 3 of 3):

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No More Than a Quart a Day of Hibiscus Tea

Michael Greger MD | May 19, 2016 | Health

Read More: aluminum, antacids, black tea, breast milk, children, citric acid, citrus, fruit juice, green tea, heavy metals, herbal tea, hibiscus tea, iron, kidney failure, lemons, limes, manganese, oolong tea, orange juice, pregnancy, safety limits, tea, white tea, World Health Organization

Over the counter antacids are probably the most important source for human aluminum exposure in terms of dose. For example, Maalox, taken as directed, can exceed the daily safety limit more than 100-fold, and nowhere on the label does......

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Aluminum Levels in Tea

Michael Greger MD | May 17, 2016 | Health

Read More: aluminum, Alzheimer's disease, antacids, bioavailability, black tea, brain disease, brain health, candy, cans, cheese, dementia, gravy, green tea, heavy metals, herbal tea, hibiscus tea, junk food, kidney failure, oolong tea, phytonutrients, processed foods, safety limits, tea, water, World Health Organization

While aluminum is the third most abundant element on Earth, it may not be good for our brain, something we learned studying foundry workers exposed to particularly high levels. Although the role of aluminum in the development of brain......

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Is Liquid Smoke Safe?

Michael Greger MD | April 14, 2015 | Health

Read More: animal products, artificial flavors, black tea, body fat, broccoli, cancer, carcinogens, chemotherapy, chicken, coffee, cooking methods, cooking temperature, cruciferous vegetables, DNA damage, exercise, fat, fish, fish sauce, green tea, ham, herbal tea, herring, hormesis, liquid smoke, liver disease, liver health, lox, mesquite, mutation, oxidative stress, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, poultry, safety limits, salmon, smoked foods, smoking, stress, tobacco, tumor suppressor genes, turkey, vegetables

We know smoke inhalation isn't good for us, but what about smoke ingestion? Decades ago, smoke flavorings were tested to see if they caused DNA mutations in bacteria--the tests came up negative. Even as more and more smoke flavoring......